A 1946-47 Propagandas Montiel Los Reyes del Deporte card, featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and manager Adolfo Luque, who died on this day (July 3) in 1957 in Havana, Cuba.

A 1946-47 Propagandas Montiel Los Reyes del Deporte card, featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher and manager Adolfo Luque, who died on this day (July 3) in 1957 in Havana, Cuba.

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mightyflynn:

HAVANA, CUBA - March 9, 1947:  Larry MacPhail (wearing sun glasses); to the right, (face partially hidden by McPhail’s head) is “Memphis” Engleberg, and at extreme right (over sharp corner of dugout) is Connie Immerman.
Photo by Hy Peskin, courtesy Collier’s Magazine from I.N.P. via lelands
______________________

As usual that spring, the Dodgers were playing the Yankees in a series of exhibition games. In a column under his name that was being ghosted for him by Harold Parrott, [Leo] Durocher issued “a declaration of war” against the Yankees. He charged that [Larry] MacPhail … ”had resolved to knock me and make life as hard as possible for me.”
On March 9, at a game in Havana, the feeling between Durocher and [Branch] Rickey on the one hand and MacPhail on the other came to a head over the presence of a pair of gamblers, one of them Memphis Engelberg, in or adjacent to MacPhail’s box. Both Durocher and Rickey publicly commented that there apparently was one set of rules for Leo and another for MacPhail and the rest of baseball. MacPhail angrily denied that he was in any way responsible for the presence of the two gamblers—but whether or not MacPhail knew how they got there, he must have recognized them and realized their proximity was bound to cause comment.
Aroused by the remarks of Rickey and Durocher, MacPhail brought countercharges against both of them, but especially against Durocher, accusing them of “conduct detrimental to baseball.” [Commissioner Happy] Chandler called a hearing. By this time, unfortunately, there were other factors at work. Back in Brooklyn, disturbed over Durocher’s role in Laraine Day’s divorce action, and upset over Leo’s earlier associations off the field, the Catholic Youth Organization withdrew from the Dodger Knothole Club, claiming that Durocher was “undermining the moral training of Brooklyn’s Roman Catholic youth.” Rickey did his best to smooth things out, but he ran into the stubborn objections of higher-ups in the Catholic clergy. Privately, the late Frank Murphy, Justice of the United States Supreme Court and an influential Catholic layman, made known his disapproval of Durocher’s behavior.
On April 9, a week before the season opened, Chandler announced his startling decision. Both the Yanks and the Dodgers were fined $2,000 as clubs. Dressen was suspended 30 days. Parrott was fined $500 for ghosting Durocher’s column and talking too much, and Durocher was thrown out of baseball for the rest of the year.
- Robert Shaplen, Sports Illustrated (June 6, 1955)
Read the rest: "The Nine Lives of Leo Durocher"

mightyflynn:

HAVANA, CUBA - March 9, 1947:  Larry MacPhail (wearing sun glasses); to the right, (face partially hidden by McPhail’s head) is “Memphis” Engleberg, and at extreme right (over sharp corner of dugout) is Connie Immerman.

Photo by Hy Peskin, courtesy Collier’s Magazine from I.N.P. via lelands

______________________

As usual that spring, the Dodgers were playing the Yankees in a series of exhibition games. In a column under his name that was being ghosted for him by Harold Parrott, [Leo] Durocher issued “a declaration of war” against the Yankees. He charged that [Larry] MacPhail … ”had resolved to knock me and make life as hard as possible for me.”

On March 9, at a game in Havana, the feeling between Durocher and [Branch] Rickey on the one hand and MacPhail on the other came to a head over the presence of a pair of gamblers, one of them Memphis Engelberg, in or adjacent to MacPhail’s box. Both Durocher and Rickey publicly commented that there apparently was one set of rules for Leo and another for MacPhail and the rest of baseball. MacPhail angrily denied that he was in any way responsible for the presence of the two gamblers—but whether or not MacPhail knew how they got there, he must have recognized them and realized their proximity was bound to cause comment.

Aroused by the remarks of Rickey and Durocher, MacPhail brought countercharges against both of them, but especially against Durocher, accusing them of “conduct detrimental to baseball.” [Commissioner Happy] Chandler called a hearing. By this time, unfortunately, there were other factors at work. Back in Brooklyn, disturbed over Durocher’s role in Laraine Day’s divorce action, and upset over Leo’s earlier associations off the field, the Catholic Youth Organization withdrew from the Dodger Knothole Club, claiming that Durocher was “undermining the moral training of Brooklyn’s Roman Catholic youth.” Rickey did his best to smooth things out, but he ran into the stubborn objections of higher-ups in the Catholic clergy. Privately, the late Frank Murphy, Justice of the United States Supreme Court and an influential Catholic layman, made known his disapproval of Durocher’s behavior.

On April 9, a week before the season opened, Chandler announced his startling decision. Both the Yanks and the Dodgers were fined $2,000 as clubs. Dressen was suspended 30 days. Parrott was fined $500 for ghosting Durocher’s column and talking too much, and Durocher was thrown out of baseball for the rest of the year.

- Robert Shaplen, Sports Illustrated (June 6, 1955)

Read the rest: "The Nine Lives of Leo Durocher"

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Cuban baseball Hall of Famer Martin Dihigo playing for Dominican team Santiago. This photo is among numerous items from the Richard Merkin Collection that are up for auction at Hake’s Americana & Collectibles.

Cuban baseball Hall of Famer Martin Dihigo playing for Dominican team Santiago. This photo is among numerous items from the Richard Merkin Collection that are up for auction at Hake’s Americana & Collectibles.

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A 1946-47 Almanque Deportivo magazine cover featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder Roberto Ortiz, who was born on this date (June 30) in 1915 in Camaguey, Cuba.

A 1946-47 Almanque Deportivo magazine cover featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder Roberto Ortiz, who was born on this date (June 30) in 1915 in Camaguey, Cuba.

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Cuban baseball Hall of Famer Jack Calvo, as a member of the Washington Senators, bats during spring training at the University of Virginia. Calvo died on this day (June 15) in 1965.

Cuban baseball Hall of Famer Jack Calvo, as a member of the Washington Senators, bats during spring training at the University of Virginia. Calvo died on this day (June 15) in 1965.

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A 1926-27 Aguilitas card featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame infielder Bartolo Portuondo, who died on this day (May 26) in 1981.

A 1926-27 Aguilitas card featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame infielder Bartolo Portuondo, who died on this day (May 26) in 1981.

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A 1949-50 Cuban League card featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame shortstop Willy Miranda, who was born on this day (May 24) in 1926.

A 1949-50 Cuban League card featuring Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame shortstop Willy Miranda, who was born on this day (May 24) in 1926.

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Negro leagues star Lennie Pearson playing for Habana in a photo that was up for auction at Hake’s Americana & Collectibles in November 2011. Pearson was born on this day (May 23) in 1918 in Akron, Ohio.

Negro leagues star Lennie Pearson playing for Habana in a photo that was up for auction at Hake’s Americana & Collectibles in November 2011. Pearson was born on this day (May 23) in 1918 in Akron, Ohio.

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Former Cuban League player Emilio Cabrera, who according to Who’s Who in Cuban Baseball, 1878-1961, was born in Havana on this day (May 22) in 1921.
This photo appears on the Los Cubanitos Facebook page, dedicated to the youth baseball team of Cuban exiles he founded in Miami in 1965.

Former Cuban League player Emilio Cabrera, who according to Who’s Who in Cuban Baseball, 1878-1961, was born in Havana on this day (May 22) in 1921.

This photo appears on the Los Cubanitos Facebook page, dedicated to the youth baseball team of Cuban exiles he founded in Miami in 1965.

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May 20: On this day in 1971, Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame player Martin Dihigo died in Cienfuegos, Cuba.
In this photo, which was up for auction at Lelands in 2006, Dihigo’s jersey has a Habana’s “1943-44” Champions patch.

May 20: On this day in 1971, Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame player Martin Dihigo died in Cienfuegos, Cuba.

In this photo, which was up for auction at Lelands in 2006, Dihigo’s jersey has a Habana’s “1943-44” Champions patch.

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